Factors behind the success of the european expansionism

Posted by moleboi During the sixteenth century expansion became a key theme across the face of Early Modern Europe; this caused the sixteenth century to acquire the retrospective name of the Age of Expansion or Age of Discovery. According to the historian Richard Mackenney the cause of European expansion during this period can be explained in terms of three major symptoms: Exploration had not been an entirely new concept to the world of Early Modern Europe. During the Middle Ages exploration had been overland and eastward, mostly dominated by tales of the Italian Marco Polo and his establishment of embassies with trading posts such as Constantinople and Samarkand along the illustrious Silk Road, which stretched all the way from Venice to China via Asia Minor, Persia and India.

Factors behind the success of the european expansionism

Bring fact-checked results to the top of your browser search. European expansion since The global expansion of western Europe between the s and the s differed in several important ways from the expansionism and colonialism of previous centuries.

Factors behind the success of the european expansionism

Along with the rise of the Industrial Revolution, which economic historians generally trace to the s, and the continuing spread of industrialization in the empire-building countries came a shift in the strategy of trade with the colonial world.

Instead of being primarily buyers of colonial products and frequently under strain to offer sufficient salable goods to balance the exchangeas in the past, the industrializing nations increasingly became sellers in search of markets for the growing volume of their machine-produced goods.

Furthermore, over the years there occurred a decided shift in the composition of demand for goods produced in the colonial areas.

Factors behind the success of the european expansionism

Spices, sugar, and slaves became relatively less important with the advance of industrialization, concomitant with a rising demand for raw materials for industry e.

This shift in trading patterns entailed in the long run changes in colonial policy and practice as well as in the nature of colonial acquisitions.

The urgency to create markets and the incessant pressure for new materials and food were eventually reflected in colonial practices, which sought to adapt the colonial areas to the new priorities of the industrializing nations.

Factors behind the success of the european expansionism adaptation involved major disruptions of existing social systems over wide areas of the globe. Before the impact of the Industrial Revolution, European activities in the rest of the world were largely confined to: However disruptive these changes may have been to the societies of Africa, South Americaand the isolated plantation and white-settler colonies, the social systems over most of the Earth outside Europe nevertheless remained much the same as they had been for centuries in some places for millennia.

These societies, with their largely self-sufficient small communities based on subsistence agriculture and home industry, provided poor markets for the mass-produced goods flowing from the factories of the technologically advancing countries; nor were the existing social systems flexible enough to introduce and rapidly expand the commercial agriculture and, later, mineral extraction required to supply the food and raw material needs of the empire builders.

The adaptation of the nonindustrialized parts of the world to become more profitable adjuncts of the industrializing nations embraced, among other things: The classic illustration of this last policy is found in India. For centuries India had been an exporter of cotton goods, to such an extent that Great Britain for a long period imposed stiff tariff duties to protect its domestic manufacturers from Indian competition.

Yet, by the middle of the 19th century, India was receiving one-fourth of all British exports of cotton piece goods and had lost its own export markets. Clearly, such significant transformations could not get very far in the absence of appropriate political changes, such as the development of a sufficiently cooperative local elite, effective administrative techniques, and peace-keeping instruments that would assure social stability and environments conducive to the radical social changes imposed by a foreign power.

European expansion since 1763

Consistent with these purposes was the installation of new, or amendments of old, legal systems that would facilitate the operation of a money, business, and private land economy. Tying it all together was the imposition of the culture and language of the dominant power.

The changing nature of the relations between centres of empire and their colonies, under the impact of the unfolding Industrial Revolution, was also reflected in new trends in colonial acquisitions. While in preceding centuries colonies, trading posts, and settlements were in the main, except for South America, located along the coastline or on smaller islands, the expansions of the late 18th century and especially of the 19th century were distinguished by the spread of the colonizing powers, or of their emigrants, into the interior of continents.

Such continental extensions, in general, took one of two forms, or some combination of the two: At the heart of Western expansionism was the growing disparity in technologies between those of the leading European nations and those of the rest of the world. Differences between the level of technology in Europe and some of the regions on other continents were not especially great in the early part of the 18th century.

In fact, some of the crucial technical knowledge used in Europe at that time came originally from Asia. During the 18th century, however, and at an accelerating pace in the 19th and 20th centuries, the gap between the technologically advanced countries and technologically backward regions kept on increasing despite the diffusion of modern technology by the colonial powers.

The most important aspect of this disparity was the technical superiority of Western armaments, for this superiority enabled the West to impose its will on the much larger colonial populations. Advances in communication and transportation, notably railroads, also became important tools for consolidating foreign rule over extensive territories.

And along with the enormous technical superiority and the colonizing experience itself came important psychological instruments of minority rule by foreigners: Naturally, the above description and summary telescope events that transpired over many decades and the incidence of the changes varied from territory to territory and from time to time, influenced by the special conditions in each area, by what took place in the process of conquest, by the circumstances at the time when economic exploitation of the possessions became desirable and feasible, and by the varying political considerations of the several occupying powers.

Moreover, it should be emphasized that expansion policies and practices, while far from haphazard, were rarely the result of long-range and integrated planning. The drive for expansion was persistent, as were the pressures to get the greatest advantage possible out of the resulting opportunities.

But the expansions arose in the midst of intense rivalry among major powers that were concerned with the distribution of power on the continent of Europe itself as well as with ownership of overseas territories.

Thus, the issues of national power, national wealth, and military strength shifted more and more to the world stage as commerce and territorial acquisitions spread over larger segments of the globe.

In fact, colonies were themselves often levers of military power—sources of military supplies and of military manpower and bases for navies and merchant marines. European colonial activity —c. Nonetheless, there was a convergence of developments in the early s, which, despite many qualifications, delineates a new stage in European expansionism and especially in that of the most successful empire builder, Great Britain.

As a result of the Treaty of Paris, France lost nearly all of its colonial empire, while Britain became, except for Spainthe largest colonial power in the world. In addition, the new commanding position on the seas provided an opportunity for Great Britain to probe for additional markets in Asia and Africa and to try to break the Spanish trade monopoly in South America.

During this period, the scope of British world interests broadened dramatically to cover the South Pacific, the Far East, the South Atlantic, and the coast of Africa. The initial aim of this outburst of maritime activity was not so much the acquisition of extensive fresh territory as the attainment of a far-flung network of trading posts and maritime bases.

The latter, it was hoped, would serve the interdependent aims of widening foreign commerce and controlling ocean shipping routes. But in the long run many of these initial bases turned out to be steppingstones to future territorial conquests.

Because the indigenous populations did not always take kindly to foreign incursions into their homelands, even when the foreigners limited themselves to small enclaves, penetration of interiors was often necessary to secure base areas against attack.

Loss of the American colonies The path of conquest and territorial growth was far from orderly.The classic way to enumerate these factors is to say that the expansion was precipitated by "God, gold, and glory." During the Age of Exploration, Europeans were motivated by a variety of factors.

The Colonization of Africa was due to a wide range of factors, not only economic and political but also DATE: 26/09/ INTRODUCTION The reasons behind European imperialism in Africa were purely The scramble for Africa was described as the golden period of European expansionism in the 19th century.

It was an age in . Get an answer for 'What were the main factors that led to the rise of industrialization in the U.S.

in the late s?' and find homework help for other America: Pathways to the Present questions. EUROPEAN EXPANSION: ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS () During the period from to , western Europe centered on an era of overseas exploration and economic expansion that transformed society.

This assignment will assess the factors behind the economic success of Japan. These factors will be assessed through units of time throughout the Japanese history and how these factors of success have also contributed to .

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